BPM

Digital arm of the eponymous poetry zine

Edited by Andrew Hughes And Whit Griffin

The Mythic School of the Mountain: Black Mountain College

My intoxication with Black Mountain College began the summer of 1987, when Ronald H. Bayes, my Literary Godfather, laid in my hands Martin Duberman’s Black Mountain: An Exploration in Community. I had just started teaching at what was then St. Andrew’s Presbyterian College in Laurinburg — a little town every bit as obscure as the town of Black Mountain was in 1933 when the first faculty members of Black Mountain College arrived at the rail station on Sutton Avenue and were spirited off to their new home at the Blue Ridge Assembly in the very rural Swannanoa Valley.

Bayes, a longtime distinguished professor and writer-in-residence at St. Andrew’s — by my lights, a fringe Black Mountain poet himself — had been intimates with Black Mountain writers Charles Olson, Ed Dorn, Jonathan Williams, Joel Oppenheimer, and Fielding Dawson, and a very close friend of Robert Creeley until Creeley’s death. Through Bayes’s magical connections, many of those writers had been frequent visitors to the St. Andrew’s campus, and, in 1974, St. Andrew’s hosted the now mythic, actually unimaginable (so large are the names on this list), Black Mountain Festival, which featured the writers already mentioned as well as John Cage, Merce Cunningham, Buckminster Fuller, and M.C. Richards.”

from Joseph Bathanti’s article 

mmebottomline:

This past weekend in Fayetteville was one of the best weekends I’ve had in a long time. I spent a few days in the company of some sweet, lovely, really damn good poets at The Next Poetry Festival, organized by Matt Henriksen. As I told Matt, the event left me hopeful about and re-encouraged re: poetry at a time when I’d been feeling pretty alienated from the stuff. 
Top to bottom left: Matt Henriksen introducing Tim Van Dyke; Pearl listening to poems; Sara Nicholson reading from ARK. 
Top to bottom right: yours truly climbing the ladder at Dickson Street Bookshop; Jane Gregory, Sara Nicholson, & Whit Griffin checking out some great folk art that Whit found when he and I stopped into Mystic Melon. 

mmebottomline:

This past weekend in Fayetteville was one of the best weekends I’ve had in a long time. I spent a few days in the company of some sweet, lovely, really damn good poets at The Next Poetry Festival, organized by Matt Henriksen. As I told Matt, the event left me hopeful about and re-encouraged re: poetry at a time when I’d been feeling pretty alienated from the stuff.
 

Top to bottom left: Matt Henriksen introducing Tim Van Dyke; Pearl listening to poems; Sara Nicholson reading from ARK.

 

Top to bottom right: yours truly climbing the ladder at Dickson Street Bookshop; Jane Gregory, Sara Nicholson, & Whit Griffin checking out some great folk art that Whit found when he and I stopped into Mystic Melon

ARK Marathon Reading 3/22/14
Getting ready to take their turn at the podium:  Sara Nicholson, Mark Lamoureux, Matt Henriksen, Jane Gregory, C. Violet Eaton, and Michael Martin Shea. 

ARK Marathon Reading 3/22/14

Getting ready to take their turn at the podium:  Sara Nicholson, Mark Lamoureux, Matt Henriksen, Jane Gregory, C. Violet Eaton, and Michael Martin Shea. 

The Next Poetry Festival

The Next Poetry Festival featuring a marathon reading of Ronald Johnson’s ARK & readings of original poetry from C.S. Carrier, Julia Cohen, Tim Earley, Phil Estes, Lea Graham, Jane Gregory, Whit Griffin, Stacy Kidd, Mark Lamoureux, Sara Nicholson, Michael Martín Shea, Mark Spitzer, Shannon Tharp, Tim VanDyke, and Deborah Woodard All events are free or $3 donation. The Next Poetry Festival Schedule of Events Friday, March 21 7-10 pm Nightbird Books 205 W. Dickson St. Michael Martin Shea Mark Spitzer Phil Estes Stacy Kidd Lea Graham Deborah Woodard Mark Lamoureux Julia Cohen Shannon Tharp Saturday, March 22 2-4 pm Backspace 546 W. Center St., Unit H C.S. Carrier Whit Griffin Tim Earley Tim Van Dyke Sara Nicholson Jane Gregory Saturday, March 22 6-12 pm Fayetteville Underground 101 W. Mountain St. A marathon reading of Ronald Johnson’s ARK

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